Abstract

This study investigated the effect of self-regulation on attention to reward-relevant stimuli. Previous research has suggested that exercising self-control leads to a shift in motivation and attention to engage in more rewarding and gratifying activities. Participants either participated in an initial task that required self-regulation or an easier task that did not. In a second task, attention to a critical stimulus that signified reward was analyzed. Results indicated that those who had self-regulated responded more frequently to the critical stimulus than those who had completed the easier task. The two groups did not differ in their responses to non-critical stimuli. This suggests that exercising self-control leads to increased attentional sensitivity to cues that signify reward but not to other stimuli.

Advisor

Gillund, Gary

Department

Psychology

Disciplines

Cognitive Psychology

Publication Date

2016

Degree Granted

Bachelor of Arts

Document Type

Senior Independent Study Thesis

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© Copyright 2016 Jennifer Filak