Abstract

Reality television is a popular medium. It allows its audiences to observe "real" people live various aspects of their lives, whether it is the birth of a child, a cooking competition, or a wedding. With its growing genres, reality television influences viewers in a variety of ways. One genre of reality television, wedding shows, is the focus of this study. This research study analyzed how reality TV wedding program viewing habits influence young women's desires for their own weddings and what they believe other women desire for their weddings. To analyze this topic, 17 junior and 23 senior female participants sorted 26 statements and images of wedding reception components such as cakes, flowers, reception halls, foods, music and bar options, and other miscellaneous items into categories that best fit theirs and other women's wedding desires. The participants were provided with three categories in which to sort the photographs and statements for the first time: "I would definitely want this at my wedding," "I might want this at my wedding," "I would never want this at my wedding." The participants were provided with three additional categories in which to sort the photographs and statements for a second time: "Other women would definitely want this at their wedding," "Other women would maybe want at their wedding," "Other women would never want this at their wedding." After each participant sorted each statement into one of the three categories, the researcher will record each statement and the category in which it was placed. The participants also completed a short, 10-question survey after they completed the sorting process. The results, once collected from 40 College of Wooster females, were statistically analyzed. This study found that reality TV wedding program viewing does not influence what young women desire for their own weddings or what young women believe other women would desire for their weddings.

Advisor

Wick, Margaret

Department

Communication

Disciplines

Broadcast and Video Studies

Publication Date

2012

Degree Granted

Bachelor of Arts

Document Type

Senior Independent Study Thesis

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© Copyright 2012 Sarah Abboud