Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions that college students have of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing of varying speech intelligibility. More specifically, this study investigated the perceptions college students had of individuals with hearing loss in terms of speech intelligibility, speech skills, social acceptance, academic achievement, and behavioral conduct. College students at a small, liberal arts college in the Midwest were asked to listen to three short sound clips, and to complete surveys after each clip. One sound clip was of a male with highly intelligible speech, one was a male with moderately intelligible speech, and a third clip was a male with essentially unintelligible speech. The results of this study found statistically significant differences in perceptions of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing in terms of speech intelligibility, speech skills, social acceptance, academic achievement, and behavioral conduct. Overall, this study found that college students perceived speech intelligibility to be a significant indicator of success socially, academically and behaviorally for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. The results of this study lend support to the need for continued advances in the field of audiology. Knowing the negative perceptions associated with hearing loss in the past, provides strong backing for the need for continued early identification and intervention for speech, language and hearing skills.

Advisor

Goldberg, Don

Department

Communication

Disciplines

Speech and Hearing Science | Speech Pathology and Audiology

Publication Date

2012

Degree Granted

Bachelor of Arts

Document Type

Senior Independent Study Thesis

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© Copyright 2012 Rosalie B. Keane