Abstract

This paper investigated the relationship between academic major and competitive victimhood. Participants were 90 College of Wooster students. I explored participants’ perception of victimhood in relation to their respective major. Data was collected using a three-part survey. The first part of the survey divided participants into three major groups. The second measured collective self-esteem. The third measured perceptions of victimhood of the natural science major group and the humanities major group. There was no significant support for competitive victimhood between natural science and humanities majors. However, natural science majors were found to have significantly more collective self-esteem than humanities majors. These findings suggest that there are differences in self-perception between different major groups but no competitive victimhood.

Advisor

Garcia, Amber

Department

Psychology

Disciplines

Social Psychology

Publication Date

2017

Degree Granted

Bachelor of Arts

Document Type

Senior Independent Study Thesis

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© Copyright 2017 Eli Millette