Abstract

The purpose of this study was to study was to examine how asymmetric information affected the likelihood of deception. The factors investigated via experimental and survey research included: discount rate, net potential gain, discovery rate, seller propensity to deceive, and various demographics. Past research has studied this relationship between asymmetric information and deception, but not from a multidisciplinary approach using both communication and economics. Using the data gathered from the survey and experiment, a logit regression was run. This study found that there is no significant evidence that the presence of asymmetric information affects the likelihood of deception.

Advisor

Bostdorff, Denise

Second Advisor

Sell, John

Department

Business Economics; Communication

Disciplines

Behavioral Economics | Interpersonal and Small Group Communication

Publication Date

2015

Degree Granted

Bachelor of Arts

Document Type

Senior Independent Study Thesis

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© Copyright 2015 Benjamin David Grombala