Abstract

This independent study explores the effectiveness of the strategies interest groups use to influence health care reform in the United States. This is done through testing three hypotheses The hypotheses are: 1) With all other things being equal, interest groups who are more active with the reform movement are more likely to be successful in their goals than those who are less active, 2) With all other things being equal, interest groups who are aligned with presidential health care reform initiatives are more likely to be successful in their goals than those who are not aligned, and 3) With all other things being equal, interest groups who are aligned with the ideological majority in Congress are more likely to be successful in their goals than those who are not aligned with the ideological majority in Congress. An empirical case study approach was utilized and the health care reform attempts of President Clinton, Bush, and Obama were analyzed regarding interest group activity.

Interest group’s activity (Newspaper Mentions, Ideological Alignment, Presidential Alignment, and Success Levels were observed throughout the three cases and conclusions were drawn about how interest group activities are affected in instances where the president has success and when there is a strong opposition movement against the president. The individual strategies used by interest groups were evaluated for impact on the success of a group's policy outcome.

Advisor

Moskowitz, Eric

Department

Political Science

Disciplines

American Politics | Political Science

Publication Date

2015

Degree Granted

Bachelor of Arts

Document Type

Senior Independent Study Thesis Exemplar

Jacquelyn_Hannan IS Poster 2015.pdf (1337 kB)
IS Presentation Poster

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© Copyright 2015 Jacquelyn E. Hannan