Abstract

This study examines the impact of socio-cultural factors on the bargaining power of women and on their participation in non-household production in Tanzania. Based on economic theory, we hypothesize that the existence of socio-cultural factors decreases the bargaining power of women and limits their participation in non-household production. Using the 2006 Tanzania Integrated Labor Force Survey, we empirically test this hypothesis by running robust regressions, which uses time spent on the main activity as the dependent variable. Our results indicate that when husbands share household responsibilities with their wives, women who primarily engage in unpaid household activities devote less time on housework per week, while the women in agriculture and self- employment devote more time towards their respective activities.

Advisor

Burnell, Barbara

Second Advisor

Sirbu, Anca

Department

Economics

Disciplines

Labor Economics

Publication Date

2014

Degree Granted

Bachelor of Arts

Document Type

Senior Independent Study Thesis

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© Copyright 2014 Jubilate A. Lema