Abstract

Photojournalism was the dominant form of mass media during the Second World War. Photography was the universal language, capable of communicating events across any language barrier quickly and effectively. A study of three prominent photojournalists reveals that each had a unique personal style in regards to how they captured a photographic image. The study reveals a shift in each photographer's styles and approach as the war progressed. After reviewing and analyzing the photographer's lives and photographic history, it can be concluded that each photographer was so affected by the events they witnessed in the war, that they altered both their substance and style to reflect what they had seen in order to better educate the viewer.

Advisor

Pozefsky, Peter

Department

History

Disciplines

Photography | United States History

Publication Date

2013

Degree Granted

Bachelor of Arts

Document Type

Senior Independent Study Thesis

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© Copyright 2013 Kenneth Joseph Davis